Services and Offers - Open Anthropology Cooperative 2019-11-03T18:58:14Z http://openanthcoop.ning.com/forum/categories/services-and-offers/listForCategory?feed=yes&xn_auth=no The Agapic Need in Humans tag:openanthcoop.ning.com,2017-11-09:3404290:Topic:242943 2017-11-09T12:18:42.211Z Eugene L. Mendonsa http://openanthcoop.ning.com/profile/EugeneLMendonsa <h1>I am working with a clinical psychiatrist friend on the concept of what I call the agapic need in humans.  We are working on a paper (book?) looking at agape and human groupings from an anthropological &amp; psychological perspective. </h1> <h1>1) Thoughts on agape.  The human urge to associate with other humans (&amp; pets?) seems hard-wired into us.  During the Long Paleolithic (2.3 million years) the human species lived in small loose associations of kin, affines &amp; friends – the…</h1> <h1>I am working with a clinical psychiatrist friend on the concept of what I call the agapic need in humans.  We are working on a paper (book?) looking at agape and human groupings from an anthropological &amp; psychological perspective. </h1> <h1>1) Thoughts on agape.  The human urge to associate with other humans (&amp; pets?) seems hard-wired into us.  During the Long Paleolithic (2.3 million years) the human species lived in small loose associations of kin, affines &amp; friends – the hunting &amp; gathering band.  fascinating</h1> <h1>2) They also formed networks between bands, alliances, as it were, some based on marriage ties, but others grounded in the urge to exchange gifts.  These are early urges to connect, to participate in human relations beyond the immediate band, which, in itself, was intense. </h1> <h1>3) Norms of sharing were enforced through gossip &amp; the example of elders on the youth (see <i>GREED UNBOUND</i>).  This lasted till the development of stored food wealth.</h1> <h1>4) This happened among a few Paleolithic hunting-gathering-fishing groups that could dry fish, but on a more widespread basis, did not happen until the Agricultural Revolution &amp; the domestication of herd animals. </h1> <h1>5) That led to larger than the band groups &amp; sedentary societies – farmers tied to fields &amp; eventually development of agricultural cities – walled for defense e.g., Jericho of the Bible, but many others (earliest in Natufian society). </h1> <h1>6) Larger associations put strain on urge to participate in small group life &amp; 2 things happened to provide agape like in the band: (1) formal kin food production groups evolved, but also (2) the emergence of sodalities (cults &amp; secret societies). </h1> <h1>7) These smaller groups–lineage &amp; sodality–gave us opportunity for face-to-face contact with loved ones &amp; associates who shared common interests. </h1> <h1>8) The emergence of large-scale cities &amp; modern life has put even greater stress on what I'm going to term “the agapic need.”  Nevertheless, humans were not content to put up with large-scale living &amp; went on to develop all sorts of smaller groups. </h1> <h1>9) Just a few examples would be prison gangs, street gangs, church groups, sports clubs &amp; on &amp; on.  Twitter &amp; Facebook are the latest cyber examples.</h1> <h1>10) If you have thoughts or feedback my email is <a href="mailto:docelm42@gmail.com">docelm42@gmail.com</a>  </h1> <h1> </h1> <p> </p> <p> </p> Exchange Spanish for English in the context of Anthropology tag:openanthcoop.ning.com,2016-05-18:3404290:Topic:231345 2016-05-18T15:05:01.037Z Cecilia Montero Mórtola http://openanthcoop.ning.com/profile/CeciliaMonteroMortola <p>My English is very limited and I would like to learn more in the context of Anthropology. My proposal is an hour or a little more weekly, read short articles in English, see the vocabulary, discuss them. A change of Anthropology read articles in Spanish, so that would be about 30 to forty minutes for each of the languages. To carry it out, skype is very suitable. I'm used to teach courses via Skype and other platforms. There is always someone who needs some correction in Spanish, or going…</p> <p>My English is very limited and I would like to learn more in the context of Anthropology. My proposal is an hour or a little more weekly, read short articles in English, see the vocabulary, discuss them. A change of Anthropology read articles in Spanish, so that would be about 30 to forty minutes for each of the languages. To carry it out, skype is very suitable. I'm used to teach courses via Skype and other platforms. There is always someone who needs some correction in Spanish, or going fieldwork to Latin America or Spain ... wants to speak more clearly and eloquently ... I hope someone interested, </p> <p></p> <p>regards, </p> <p></p> <p>Cecilia</p> POSTING: TRAVELING FACULTY POSITION tag:openanthcoop.ning.com,2015-12-07:3404290:Topic:223693 2015-12-07T15:31:53.827Z SherriLynn Colby-Bottel http://openanthcoop.ning.com/profile/SherriLynnColbyBottel <p>Deadline March 1, 2016</p> <p>Health and Community: Globalization, Culture, and Care<br></br> <br></br> Reports to: Program Director<br></br> Location: Travels with program<br></br> Type: Full-time 6-month contract or Full-time full academic year contract<br></br> <br></br> To apply visit: <a href="http://www.worldlearning.org/employment/" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">http://www.worldlearning.org/employment/</a></p> <p>General Description:<br></br> The International Honors Program (IHP), a program of SIT, offers…</p> <p>Deadline March 1, 2016</p> <p>Health and Community: Globalization, Culture, and Care<br/> <br/> Reports to: Program Director<br/> Location: Travels with program<br/> Type: Full-time 6-month contract or Full-time full academic year contract<br/> <br/> To apply visit: <a href="http://www.worldlearning.org/employment/" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">http://www.worldlearning.org/employment/</a></p> <p>General Description:<br/> The International Honors Program (IHP), a program of SIT, offers international, comparative study abroad programs. We are currently seeking traveling faculty members to join an interdisciplinary team of faculty, fellows, and host country coordinators for IHP’s Health and Community: Globalization, Culture, and Care programs in Fall 2015 and Spring 2016.  Each four-month program will take approximately 30 students from top-tier U.S. colleges and universities to four countries to do inter-disciplinary study from a comparative perspective. Tentative itineraries are as follows:<br/> <br/> • Fall 2016  #1 (<span class="aBn"><span class="aQJ">August 21 to December 10, 2016</span></span>):  Washington, DC, USA; Delhi, India; Zwelethemba/Cape Town, South Africa; and São Paulo, Brazil<br/> • Fall 2016  #2 (<span class="aBn"><span class="aQJ">August 14 to December 3, 2016</span></span>): Washington, DC, USA; Hanoi, Vietnam; Johannesburg/Bushbuckridge, South Africa; and Buenos Aires, Argentina<br/> <br/> • Spring 2017 # 1 (<span class="aBn"><span class="aQJ">January 14 to May 6, 2017</span></span>): Washington, DC, USA; Delhi, India; Zwelethemba/Cape Town, South Africa; and São Paulo, Brazil<br/> • Spring 2017 #2 (<span class="aBn"><span class="aQJ">January 22 to May 13, 2017</span></span>): Washington, DC, USA; Hanoi, Vietnam; Johannesburg/Bushbuckridge, South Africa; and Buenos Aires, Argentina<br/> More information can be found at: <a href="http://studyabroad.sit.edu/sn/programs/locations/ihp-comparative/" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">http://studyabroad.sit.edu/sn/programs/locations/ihp-comparative/</a><br/> <br/> Specific Responsibilities:<br/> The Health and Community program is designed for students who wish to study the complex issues of health, community, and globalization from a comparative perspective. Our students come from diverse backgrounds, and many are working towards careers in global/public health, biomedicine, alternative medicine, international and community development, and medical anthropology/sociology. The Health and Community program is comprised of two formal courses led by traveling faculty that are integrated with a field-based program. Each country’s field-based program is comprised of: Two formal courses led by local in-country faculty; homestays with local families; guest lectures by local academics, politicians and policy makers; site visits and meetings with NGOs, neighborhood organizations and community activists. IHP’s experiential learning model is grounded in critical inquiry and analysis, but attempts to bring those skills to bear on particular places and themes. It also helps students learn how to interact with a variety of local actors representing different and competing visions of health, well-being, and community, and to situate claims-making in contexts of unequal access to wealth, resources, globalization, and cultural/political representation.<br/> <br/> We are seeking traveling faculty members who will facilitate learning and teach the two following classes:<br/> <br/> • Health Culture and Community (a seminar-style course based in medical anthropology or a related field)<br/> • Introduction to Community Health Research Methods (a critical community-based research class co-taught with local country coordinators; including participatory methods, qualitative and quantitative methods and interdisciplinary approaches)<br/> <br/> Other duties as assigned.<br/> <br/> Required Qualifications:<br/> Required Experience:<br/> The ideal candidates should have: a) expertise in the topic areas listed above and general knowledge of history and social theory; b) experience teaching at the college level and commitment to experiential learning, including non-didactic methods that promote critical thinking and field-based research, discussion, and self-reflection; c) research and practical experience related to health and community issues outside the U.S. and Europe, preferably in one of the countries in the program; d) the physical stamina, emotional maturity, mental health, and personal qualities—patience, adaptability, collegiality, cross-cultural competence, and organization—needed to build an intensive, team-oriented study abroad program that covers four countries in three months; f) the ability and desire to support and communicate with students throughout the study abroad experience both in and outside of the classroom.<br/> <br/> Required Education:<br/> The ideal candidates should have a Ph.D. (or clinical degree/MPH equivalent) in a related field, such as medical anthropology, biological science, sociology, epidemiology or public health/policy, with experience living and working abroad<br/> <br/> To apply:<br/> Please visit the World Learning employment website at <a href="http://www.worldlearning.org/employment/" rel="noreferrer" target="_blank">http://www.worldlearning.org/employment/</a> and apply via the online application system by uploading your letter of interest, as well as a CV (including the contact information of three academic references).<br/> <br/> Traveling with students for four months, and guiding their learning and field research in global cities, as well as conducting classroom discussions and small-group seminars, presents unique challenges and demands particular qualities. Please consider this carefully in your letter of interest, paying special attention to how you would handle the conceptual, pedagogical, intercultural and interpersonal demands of a program like IHP’s Health and Community.  What in your academic background and work experience has prepared you to do this job? Why this job instead of a more traditional academic job? Please indicate your preferences for both tracks (Fall 1 or 2; Spring 1 or 2), as well as your availability (one semester or a full academic year).<br/> <br/> World Learning is an equal opportunity employer.</p> PhD scholarship: Pentecostalism Brazil-Australia – Applications due 15 August tag:openanthcoop.ning.com,2014-06-27:3404290:Topic:210265 2014-06-27T08:47:22.110Z Cristina Rocha http://openanthcoop.ning.com/profile/CristinaRocha <p>Hi everyone, I am looking for an excellent PhD student for my research project: "<i>Pentecostal Connections: Migration, Missionaries, Mobility and Media between Australia and Brazil"</i></p> <p><i> </i></p> <p align="center"><b>RELIGION AND SOCIETY:  PhD RESEARCH SCHOLARSHIP AT UWS</b></p> <p> </p> <p>The Religion and Society Research Centre / School of Social Sciences and Psychology is seeking an excellent candidate to undertake a doctoral project as part of an Australian Research Council…</p> <p>Hi everyone, I am looking for an excellent PhD student for my research project: "<i>Pentecostal Connections: Migration, Missionaries, Mobility and Media between Australia and Brazil"</i></p> <p><i> </i></p> <p align="center"><b>RELIGION AND SOCIETY:  PhD RESEARCH SCHOLARSHIP AT UWS</b></p> <p> </p> <p>The Religion and Society Research Centre / School of Social Sciences and Psychology is seeking an excellent candidate to undertake a doctoral project as part of an Australian Research Council funded Future Fellowship.</p> <p>Dr Cristina Rocha’s Future Fellowship investigates the rise of global Pentecostalism by exploring a <b>Pentecostal transnational religious field between Australia and Brazil</b>. In particular, it aims to investigate the role of Pentecostalism in the social welfare of migrants in Australia. Broadly speaking, this research intends to contribute significant new knowledge to the ways in which religion is globalised and localised in everyday life, the role of religion in assisting migrants, and the continuing vitality and renewed public role of religion in late modernity.</p> <p>The doctoral project will be developed by the student and has been conceived to add an important dimension to the Future Fellowship study. <b>The project will involve an in-depth case study of a Brazilian mega-church in Australia, with fieldwork conducted in Sydney, Melbourne and Brazil</b>.</p> <p> </p> <p><b>CRITERIA</b></p> <ul> <li>Bachelor Honours degree (First Class) and/or a research Master degree in anthropology, sociology or cultural study of contemporary religion.</li> <li>Be highly motivated to undertake multi-disciplinary research.</li> <li>Applicants must also demonstrate a high level of English and Brazilian Portuguese proficiency. International applicants should refer to the following webpage regarding English Language requirements:</li> </ul> <p><a href="http://www.uws.edu.au/international/admissions/english_language_requirement">http://www.uws.edu.au/international/admissions/english_language_requirement</a></p> <ul> <li>Evidence of Honours/Masters thesis or other publication</li> </ul> <p> </p> <p><b>What does the scholarship provide?</b></p> <ul> <li>The scholarship will provide an index-linked, tax free stipend of $25,392 p.a. for up to 3 years</li> <li>$2000 p.a. for project costs and conference travel, as well as $5000 towards three months fieldwork in Brazil in the second year of candidature</li> <li>International applicants may apply to have tuition fees waived for up to 3 years.</li> </ul> <p> </p> <p><b>Need more information?</b></p> <p class="default">Ø  Contact the Principal Supervisor Dr Cristina Rocha  c.rocha@uws.edu.au; +61 2 9772 6368 to discuss the project in more detail</p> <p class="default">Ø  Contact the Research Scholarships Development Officer to discuss the scholarships application process: Ms Tracy Mills: <a href="mailto:t.mills@uws.edu.au">t.mills@uws.edu.au</a></p> <p class="default"> </p> <p class="default">Applicants should submit the Application Form (Section C, and International Student if relevant) including contact details for two (2) academic referees, a covering letter and current CV by email to<a href="mailto:hdrscholarships@uws.edu.au">hdrscholarships@uws.edu.au</a> or by mail to Office of Research Services, Locked Bag 1797, Penrith NSW 2751. <b><u>Applications close</u></b><u> </u><b><u>AUGUST 15 2014.</u></b></p> <p class="default"> </p> <p class="default">Detailed instructions and Application forms are available at <a href="http://www.uws.edu.au/research/scholarships">http://www.uws.edu.au/research/scholarships</a></p> <p> </p> 10 masters bursaries (full fees plus stipend) available in Anthropology at UCL 2014-15 tag:openanthcoop.ning.com,2014-05-12:3404290:Topic:208298 2014-05-12T17:34:21.007Z Gill Conquest http://openanthcoop.ning.com/profile/GillConquest233 <p>The UCL Graduate Support Scheme is offering <b>10 bursaries in Anthropology</b> for the academic year 2014-15. (<a href="http://www.ucl.ac.uk/anthropology/anthropology-news/ucl-graduate-support-scheme-summers-workshop">http://www.ucl.ac.uk/anthropology/anthropology-news/ucl-graduate-support-scheme-summers-workshop</a>)</p> <p></p> <p>Bursaries are available for the following masters programmes:…</p> <p>The UCL Graduate Support Scheme is offering <b>10 bursaries in Anthropology</b> for the academic year 2014-15. (<a href="http://www.ucl.ac.uk/anthropology/anthropology-news/ucl-graduate-support-scheme-summers-workshop">http://www.ucl.ac.uk/anthropology/anthropology-news/ucl-graduate-support-scheme-summers-workshop</a>)</p> <p></p> <p>Bursaries are available for the following masters programmes:</p> <ul> <li><a href="http://www.ucl.ac.uk/anthropology/studying/msc-social-cultural-anthropology">MSc Social and Cultural Anthropology</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.ucl.ac.uk/anthropology/studying/ma-culture-materials-design">MA Culture, Materials and Design</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.ucl.ac.uk/aed">MSc Anthropology, Environment and Development</a></li> <li><a href="http://www.ucl.ac.uk/anthropology/studying/msc-medical-anthropology">MSc Medical Anthropology</a></li> </ul> <p></p> <p>UK/EU students are eligible to apply for the bursaries, which are awarded on the basis of financial need and include a full fee waiver and £10,000 living allowance. There is also the opportunity to apply for childcare assistance. <b>Application deadline 30<sup>th</sup> June.</b> See <a href="http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/fees-funding/support-scheme">http://www.ucl.ac.uk/prospective-students/graduate/fees-funding/support-scheme</a> for further details.</p> <p></p> <p>As part of this scheme, UCL Anthropology is holding a <b>Summer Workshop on 29<sup>th</sup> May</b> for prospective students to find out more about the eligible courses, the bursaries and the application process. The outline for the day is as follows:</p> <p></p> <p>11.00: Registration, tea/coffee</p> <p>11.30–12.30: Talks about UCL, the department and the bursaries</p> <p>12.30–1.30: Lunch</p> <p>1.30–3.30: Taster session in one of the eligible programmes, run by current students and researchers</p> <p>3.30–4.30: Afternoon tea and chat with current students, student mentors. Advice on the application process / tour around campus available</p> <p></p> <p>Lunch and refreshments will be provided. Spaces for the workshop are limited so please email <a href="mailto:j.skorecka@ucl.ac.uk">j.skorecka@ucl.ac.uk</a> to book a place. Assistance with travel and childcare costs is available - contact <a href="mailto:david.jeevendrampillai.10@ucl.ac.uk">david.jeevendrampillai.10@ucl.ac.uk</a> for more information.</p> Internships at the Human Relations Area Files tag:openanthcoop.ning.com,2014-04-17:3404290:Topic:207687 2014-04-17T18:12:13.029Z Michael Fischer http://openanthcoop.ning.com/profile/MichaelFischer <p><a href="http://storage.ning.com/topology/rest/1.0/file/get/3037728800?profile=original" target="_self"><img class="align-left" src="http://storage.ning.com/topology/rest/1.0/file/get/3037728800?profile=RESIZE_180x180" width="60"></img></a> <span class="font-size-4" style="color: #000080;"><strong>The Human Relations Area Files (HRAF) at Yale University is accepting applications for two internship openings for the year beginning the summer of 2014.  Applications are due May 20, 2014.</strong></span></p> <p></p> <p><span class="font-size-3">The first is for IT development to support online cross-cultural…</span></p> <p><a href="http://storage.ning.com/topology/rest/1.0/file/get/3037728800?profile=original" target="_self"><img width="60" src="http://storage.ning.com/topology/rest/1.0/file/get/3037728800?profile=RESIZE_180x180" width="60" class="align-left"/></a><span style="color: #000080;" class="font-size-4"><strong>The Human Relations Area Files (HRAF) at Yale University is accepting applications for two internship openings for the year beginning the summer of 2014.  Applications are due May 20, 2014.</strong></span></p> <p></p> <p><span class="font-size-3">The first is for IT development to support online cross-cultural resources. See <a title="HRAF IT Development Interm PDF" href="http://hraf.yale.edu/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/InternProgrammer.pdf" target="_blank">announcement</a> [<a title="IT Development Internship PDF" href="http://hraf.yale.edu/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/InternProgrammer.pdf" target="_blank">pdf</a>] for more information.</span></p> <p><span class="font-size-3">The second is in honor of Melvin Ember and is for learning about cross-cultural research through practical experience. See <a title="HRAF Melvin Ember Internship PDF" href="http://hraf.yale.edu/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/InternMelvinEmber.pdf" target="_blank">announcement</a> [<a title="HRAF Melvin Ember Internship PDF" href="http://hraf.yale.edu/wp-content/uploads/2014/04/InternMelvinEmber.pdf" target="_blank">pdf</a>] for more information.</span></p> <p><span class="font-size-3">The internships will reimburse expenses (living, meals, and miscellaneous expenses) of up to $400 per week for 48 weeks beginning the summer of 2014. Travel costs up to $800 will also be reimbursed. Hours are flexible, but are based on a 37.5 hour week.</span></p> <p><span class="font-size-3">For further information <a href="http://hraf.yale.edu/internships-at-hraf/" target="_blank">see HRAF's announcement</a>.</span></p> Career Opportunity tag:openanthcoop.ning.com,2014-03-21:3404290:Topic:206960 2014-03-21T10:05:21.184Z Mike Robinson http://openanthcoop.ning.com/profile/MikeRobinson <p><b>University of Birmingham</b></p> <p><b> </b></p> <p><b>Ironbridge International Institute for Cultural Heritage</b></p> <p><b>School of History and Cultures</b></p> <p><b>Lecturer / Senior Lecturer / Reader, Cultural Heritage Studies</b></p> <p><b> </b></p> <p><b>Lecturer / Senior Lecturer / Reader</b></p> <p> </p> <p>£37,756 - £70,106 (Lecturer salary from £37,756 - £45,053 a year with potential progression to £50,688 a year / Senior Lecturer/Reader salary from £46,400- £53,765 a year…</p> <p><b>University of Birmingham</b></p> <p><b> </b></p> <p><b>Ironbridge International Institute for Cultural Heritage</b></p> <p><b>School of History and Cultures</b></p> <p><b>Lecturer / Senior Lecturer / Reader, Cultural Heritage Studies</b></p> <p><b> </b></p> <p><b>Lecturer / Senior Lecturer / Reader</b></p> <p> </p> <p>£37,756 - £70,106 (Lecturer salary from £37,756 - £45,053 a year with potential progression to £50,688 a year / Senior Lecturer/Reader salary from £46,400- £53,765 a year with potential progression to £70,106 a year). The successful candidate will be appointed at the grade appropriate to their experience and qualifications.</p> <p> </p> <p>Ironbridge International Institute for Cultural Heritage is internationally recognised for its cross-disciplinary research, postgraduate heritage programme and its long term partnership with the World Heritage Site of Ironbridge Gorge and its associated museums. The Institute is seeking to appoint a Lecturer / Senior Lecturer / Reader to support its continued development in research and postgraduate activity.</p> <p> </p> <p class="Default">The Lecturer / Senior Lecturer / Reader will be based on the University’s Birmingham Campus and will be expected to make a significant contribution to the Institute’s international research profile by publishing original research and securing research funding. Alongside research you will be expected to teach on the postgraduate courses, to recruit and supervise research students and to work with external partner organisations, foremost being the Ironbridge Gorge Museum Trust. The Institute is particularly interested in applicants whose research interests fall within the following broad areas: Heritage and identity-making; The politics of world heritage; Tourism and heritage relations and; Intangible cultural heritage.  Applicants with interests in associated areas will also be considered. We welcome those who have experience of conducting research within Europe as well as beyond including East / South East Asia.</p> <p>You will have: A PhD in a heritage related disciple; Have a well-established national and international reputation in the field of heritage studies; A proven track record in research with publications in leading peer-reviewed journals and other outputs; An extensive track record of teaching and learning in HE at undergraduate and postgraduate levels and; Outstanding qualities and achievements in scholarship and research at a national and international level.</p> <p>Candidates interested in the position as a Reader would also be expected to demonstrate: Substantial intellectual distinction with a sustained contribution in research and scholarship that bestows considerable external recognition at a national and international level; Significant (invited or plenary) presentations at international conferences; Experience in a leadership role either in teaching and/or research.</p> <p><b><u>Closing date</u></b>: April 11<sup>th</sup> 2014                         <b><u>Reference</u></b>: 51230</p> <p>To download the details and submit an electronic application online visit: <a title="blocked::http://www.hr.bham.ac.uk/jobs" href="http://www.hr.bham.ac.uk/jobs">www.hr.bham.ac.uk/jobs</a> alternatively information can be obtained from 0121 415 9000. For informal enquiries, please contact Professor Mike Robinson, Director, Ironbridge International Institute for Cultural Heritage – <a href="mailto:m.d.robinson@bham.ac.uk">m.d.robinson@bham.ac.uk</a></p> <p> </p> <p> Or visit - <a href="http://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/AIH401/lecturer-senior-lecturer-reader-cultural-heritage-studies/">http://www.jobs.ac.uk/job/AIH401/lecturer-senior-lecturer-reader-cultural-heritage-studies/</a></p> <p> </p> CFP, AAA 2014: A New Anthropology of Revolution tag:openanthcoop.ning.com,2014-03-17:3404290:Topic:206717 2014-03-17T15:54:40.129Z Carwil Bjork-James http://openanthcoop.ning.com/profile/CarwilBjorkJames <p style="text-align: center;"><span class="font-size-5">Call for Papers:  </span><br></br><span class="font-size-5">A New Anthropology of Revolution</span><br></br><br></br>2014 AAA Annual Meeting<br></br>Washington, DC — December 3–7, 2014<br></br><br></br><strong>Deadline for abstracts: March 31.</strong> (Submission by March 26 very much appreciated.)<br></br>Posted online at…</p> <p style="text-align: center;"><span class="font-size-5">Call for Papers:  </span><br/><span class="font-size-5">A New Anthropology of Revolution</span><br/><br/>2014 AAA Annual Meeting<br/>Washington, DC — December 3–7, 2014<br/><br/><strong>Deadline for abstracts: March 31.</strong> (Submission by March 26 very much appreciated.)<br/>Posted online at <a href="https://my.vanderbilt.edu/cbjorkjames/2014/03/cfp-anthropology-of-revolution/" target="_blank">https://my.vanderbilt.edu/cbjorkjames/2014/03/cfp-anthropology-of-revolution/</a></p> <p><br/>Surveying the limited anthropological contribution to the study of political revolution, Bjørn Thomassen asked in a 2012 article, “Why are anthropologists so strikingly silent about political revolutions?” He used this absence to issue a clarion call: “the study of political revolutions ought to figure more prominently in both ethnography and anthropological theory.” Even as it was being described, this observed disconnect between anthropology and revolution was ending. Anthropologists have increasingly been on-the-scene in major upheavals including Latin American revolts against neoliberalism and regime-unseating protest movements from Argentina to Egypt to Thailand to Ukraine. Arguably, this new engagement with the experience and process of revolution is now bearing fruit. This panel is part of the process by which a new anthropology of revolution is being produced.<br/><br/>Anthropology offers several angles of insight into political revolution. Observers have called for an anthropological role for revolution around the cultural construction of politics, the ritualistic nature of revolutionary actions, and the lived experience of revolutionary events.  Both ethnographic engagement and a cultural approach to concepts like a popular mandate, democracy, and “the people” can help explain how political actors and actions produce revolution.  Some early anthropological attempts to theorize revolution extended the anthropology of other aspects of social life into heady moments of political transformation. The revolutionary experience was as an extension of religious feeling for Emile Durkheim and of liminality and communitas for Victor Turner.  Contributors to this panel may explore how anthropology can help reconceptualize the concept and process of revolution.<br/><br/>The late twentieth-century fracturing of the international left and criticism of grand narratives pushed attention away from revolution as an object of anthropological study. In the decades since, more anthropological attention has been paid to resistance and local political action than to societywide transformations. Nonetheless, serious examination of resistance, autonomy, the subaltern, and the domains and weapons of “the weak” offer a valuable new perspective. Panelists are invited to discuss how such approaches “from below” can offer insight into classical and contemporary forms of revolution.<br/><br/>Recent years have seen major political upheavals that expand quickly, involve enormous numbers of people, and rely less on armed violence as a means. These characteristics have allowed ethnographers, who carry out time-limited fieldwork with a limited capacity to risk their lives, to experience revolutionary changes and document dramatic events at a closer distance. Ethnographers are encouraged to use this panel to reflect on these experiences. How is new ethnographic engagement with disruptive politics and political turning points changing our view of revolution?<br/><br/>Is contemporary revolution a different social object than in previous decades? Is revolution undergoing a change in form and meaning as it becomes more approachable? What theoretical reflections emerge from a closer engagement between ethnographers and revolution? What is the place of ethnographic reportage in the swirling processes of communication through which on-the-ground events become a society-wide revolution and a worldwide spectacle?<br/><br/><strong>Please send your title and abstract to</strong> Carwil Bjork-James via e-mail to c.bjork-james [at] vanderbilt.edu. Abstracts may be of any length, but panelists should prepare to submit an abstract of 250 words or less, and to register for the conference by April 10. Conference details are online athttp://www.aaanet.org/meetings/Call-for-Papers.cfm <a href="http://www.aaanet.org/meetings/index.cfm">http://www.aaanet.org/meetings/index.cfm</a></p> CFP The Art of Requesting tag:openanthcoop.ning.com,2014-03-12:3404290:Topic:206682 2014-03-12T15:53:19.024Z Andres Dapuez http://openanthcoop.ning.com/profile/AndresDapuez <p>We invite submissions for a peer-reviewed, edited volume of works that explore supplications or asking rituals in specific ethnographic cases. Of particular interest is how prayers or asking rituals produce hope and constantly redefine notions of pity, poverty, and deprivation in the American continent, from Alaska to Tierra del Fuego. Contributions might examine various acts of prayer and oral rites and how, through them, the indigenous poor contradict state and transnational definitions of…</p> <p>We invite submissions for a peer-reviewed, edited volume of works that explore supplications or asking rituals in specific ethnographic cases. Of particular interest is how prayers or asking rituals produce hope and constantly redefine notions of pity, poverty, and deprivation in the American continent, from Alaska to Tierra del Fuego. Contributions might examine various acts of prayer and oral rites and how, through them, the indigenous poor contradict state and transnational definitions of poverty and account for natural resources according to particular property regimes. We are interested in works that approach this line of query from various directions, however, and encourage submissions that address requesting, oral rites and poverty in invigorating ways.</p> <p>Potential questions/topics to be addressed include, but are not limited to, the following:</p> <ul> <li>Rogation prayers and asking rituals</li> <li>The particular use of oral rites in defining factors of poverty</li> <li>The significance of favor and compassion in particular indigenous ideologies</li> <li>Asking for money, development and representation from governments</li> <li>The conceptualization of new subjectivities through requesting performances and, in turn, the potential of the indigenous poor in national politics</li> <li>How individual prayers and community rites address masters and forces of nature</li> </ul> <p><span>Dates</span></p> <p>Interested contributors are invited to send an abstract of 250 words and a brief biographical sketch by March 30, 2014 to <a href="mailto:askingrituals@gmail.com">askingrituals@gmail.com</a>.</p> <p>Contributions should be roughly 6,000 words (prepared according to the latest version of the MLA style) and submitted by May 30, 2014.</p> <p>Submissions may be written in Portuguese, Spanish, English, or French.</p> <p></p> <p>More info in <a href="http://askingrituals.wordpress.com">http://askingrituals.wordpress.com</a></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p></p> <p></p> Fully funded PhD position in social and cultural anthropology at the University of Leuven (Belgium) tag:openanthcoop.ning.com,2014-02-06:3404290:Topic:205962 2014-02-06T15:19:42.754Z Noel B. Salazar http://openanthcoop.ning.com/profile/NoelBSalazar <p>Fully funded PhD position in social and cultural anthropology at the University of Leuven (Belgium)</p> <p> </p> <p>The abundant media commentaries surrounding the Winter Olympic Games in Sochi, Russia, remind us that global sports events are about so much more than mere sports. While full attention is given to the intense mobilities during the actual events (in terms of athletes and their support teams, spectators, journalists and service providers), there is a different type of human…</p> <p>Fully funded PhD position in social and cultural anthropology at the University of Leuven (Belgium)</p> <p> </p> <p>The abundant media commentaries surrounding the Winter Olympic Games in Sochi, Russia, remind us that global sports events are about so much more than mere sports. While full attention is given to the intense mobilities during the actual events (in terms of athletes and their support teams, spectators, journalists and service providers), there is a different type of human activity and mobility involved during the preparations of these mega events, particularly in relation to the construction of the necessary infrastructure to host all the activities. Are you interested in finding out more about this, together with a dedicated team of people sharing this curiosity? Then this is your unique opportunity…</p> <p> </p> <p>Fully funded PhD position in social and cultural anthropology at the University of Leuven (Belgium)</p> <p><b>A Critical Analysis of Domestic Labour Mobility in the Context of Global Sports Events in Brazil</b></p> <p><b>Project</b></p> <p>This research project analyses the domestic labour mobility in the context of the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. It investigates these mobilities within a broader framework of national and regional migration policies and processes. Methodologically, the project draws on local-to-global perspectives and deploys a mixed-method approach, combining ethnographic fieldwork (direct and participant observation and in-depth interviews), semi-structured interviews with key stakeholders and a broader contextual analysis based on secondary data.</p> <p>By focusing on labour mobility, the project addresses pertinent research gaps and provides empirical evidence on domestic mobilities in South America in general and Brazil in particular. It will lead to novel insights into the socioeconomic effects of large-scale sporting events in developing countries, a research field that remains unexplored. In brief, this study will provide innovative empirical and conceptual contributions to sociocultural anthropology and the social sciences at large.</p> <p><b>Team</b></p> <p>This PhD position in anthropology is part of a larger interdisciplinary project funded by the Research Foundation Flanders (FWO). The research team will consist of the to-be-appointed PhD student, Dr. Noel B. Salazar (Supervisor, Leuven), Dr. Johan Wets (Leuven), Dr. Christiane Temmerman (Antwerp) and Lieselot Vanduynslager (PhD student working on international labour mobility in Brazil), in close collaboration with Brazilian scholars in Rio and elsewhere. The research project will be embedded within the <a href="http://soc.kuleuven.be/cumore">Cultural Mobilities Research (CuMoRe)</a> cluster of the Faculty of Social Sciences of the University of Leuven, Belgium.</p> <p><b>Tasks</b></p> <ul> <li>Conducting ethnographic fieldwork in Brazil for a period of minimum 12 months (this can be split up in multiple periods, but with a major concentration in 2016).</li> <li>Writing and completing a PhD dissertation within four years.</li> <li>Actively participating in the PhD program in Social and Cultural Anthropology.</li> <li>Collaborating with the team in research and publications.</li> <li>Participating in conferences, workshops, seminars and other scholarly activities.</li> </ul> <p><b>Profile</b></p> <ul> <li>A Master’s degree in anthropology (preferably with distinction).</li> <li>Interest in social scientific research and ability to work both independently and in team.</li> <li>A high standard of spoken and written English is required and knowledge of Portuguese (or Spanish) is a must.</li> <li>Relevant experience in/with Brazil and strong qualitative research skills will be considered a plus.</li> </ul> <p><b>Offer</b></p> <p>We offer you a full-time PhD scholarship starting on 1 October 2014. The appointment is initially for one year, but renewable for three years after a positive evaluation, leading to the completion of a PhD in anthropology. </p> <p><b>Interested?</b></p> <p>For more information please contact <a href="http://kuleuven.academia.edu/NoelBSalazar">Dr. Noel B. Salazar</a> (noel.salazar@soc.kuleuven.be).<br/> In addition to the online application, we require one recommendation letter, sent to Dr. Salazar by email before 7 March 2014.<br/> Interviews with shortlisted candidates will be scheduled between 10 and 28 March 2014.</p> <p>You can apply for this job no later than March 01, 2014 via the <u><a href="http://www.kuleuven.be/solliciteren/52853581&amp;taal=E&amp;type=AP" title="URL sollicitatietoepassing">online application tool</a></u>.</p> <p><a href="http://www.kuleuven.be/solliciteren/52853581&amp;taal=E&amp;type=AP">http://www.kuleuven.be/solliciteren/52853581</a></p> <p> </p> <p>-- <br/> ////\\\\////\\\\////\\\\////\\\\////\\\\////\\\\////\\\\////\\\\////\\\\<br/> <a href="http://kuleuven.academia.edu/NoelBSalazar">Noel B. Salazar, PhD</a><br/> President, <a href="http://www.easaonline.org/">EASA</a> (2013-2014)<br/> Vice-President, <a href="http://www.iuaes.org/">IUAES</a> (2013-2018)<br/> Board member, <a href="http://www.jongeacademie.be/">Young Academy of Belgium</a><br/> ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------<br/> Author of <a href="http://www.berghahnbooks.com/title.php?rowtag=SalazarEnvisioning">Envisioning Eden</a>, Editor of <a href="http://www.berghahnbooks.com/title.php?rowtag=SalazarTourism">Tourism Imaginaries</a><br/> ----------------------------------------------------------------------------------<br/> <a href="http://soc.kuleuven.be/cumore/">Cultural Mobilities Research (CuMoRe)</a><br/> IMMRC, Faculty of Social Sciences, University of Leuven<br/> Parkstraat 45, BE-3000 Leuven, Belgium<br/> Tel: +32 16 320159, Fax: +32 16 325902<br/> ////\\\\////\\\\////\\\\////\\\\////\\\\////\\\\////\\\\////\\\\////\\\\</p>